Merriment at the Merriman

It was fun and merriment at Merriman Creek when over 75 enthusiastic river lovers joined the Meet the Merriman event, hosted by West Gippsland Catchment Management Authority (WGCMA) recently. 

“It was a great turnout with more people than we expected coming along because they were interested in the estuary,” said WGCMA Coastal Waterways Officer Callum Edwards. 

“We held the event so that the community can have a greater appreciation of what lives in Merriman Creek estuary and learn how the estuary changes over the year and why it is so special. We also wanted to learn from the community about what they enjoy most about Merriman Creek estuary and how they like to use it,” said Callum. 

It was a fun morning of discovery with everyone learning just what lies below the surface in the estuary and the wealth of life there. 

The enthusiastic crowd enjoyed discovering waterbugs and insects with John and Olivia from Bug Blitz Trust, and Jackson from Austral Research and Consulting also caught fish in nets to show participants what fish live in the estuary and further upstream.  

“But the highlight was everyone having fun and learning more about Merriman Creek estuary and what lives in it, especially since they spend so much time down at the creek!” Callum said. 

Estuaries (where rivers meet the sea) are an important link between the ocean and land. A meeting place where fresh water from rivers and streams mixes with salty marine waters. Estuaries are dependent on both water fresh and salt water sources to maintain a healthy environment. 

Merriman Creek flows east from the Strzelecki Hills and out to sea on the edge of the township of Seaspray.  The estuary also has high cultural significance for the Gunaikurnai.  swimming. Merriman Creek estuary is listed as a priority waterway in the current Regional Water Strategy and in the Regional Catchment Strategy.   

Part of the crowd at the Meet the Merriman event
Participants at the Meet the Merriman event